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Roger and Natasha Lazarus in their new Wayne boutique, Feetures. Open since August, Feetures sells mid range shoes/boots and casual to dressy togs to youngish moms and their daughters. Lazarus says merchandise is 40 percent girls, 60 percent moms. You’ll find favorite brands like Hard Tail yoga wear, Ugg and Steve Madden, along with less familiar bridge lines, all at fairly easy to swallow prices. Lazarus says he chose to locate in downtown Wayne because of its steady foot traffic and relative lack of empty storefronts. PHOTOS BY CAROLINE O’HALLORAN

When the two women behind the successful downtown Wayne boutique, Finer Things, parted ways, both chose to stay in Wayne. Alicia Eger (center) opened Coco Blu in the Finer Things space last month. She’s shown here with Wynnewood jewelry designer Christie Gies and staffer Kelly Clarke of Devon. (Geis’ CGC Collection is one of several local labels at Coco Blu.) Eger’s former partner, Maria Delany, opened Louella in Louella Court until its Nov. move to the former DeLaurentis barbershop and Salon Tre Del on Lancaster Ave.

Roger and Natasha Lazarus in their new Wayne boutique, Feetures. Open since August, Feetures sells mid range shoes/boots and casual to dressy togs to youngish moms and their daughters. Lazarus says merchandise is 40 percent girls, 60 percent moms. You’ll find favorite brands like Hard Tail yoga wear, Ugg and Steve Madden, along with less familiar bridge lines, all at fairly easy to swallow prices. Lazarus says he chose to locate in downtown Wayne because of its steady foot traffic and relative lack of empty storefronts. PHOTOS BY CAROLINE O’HALLORAN

When the two women behind the successful downtown Wayne boutique, Finer Things, parted ways, both chose to stay in Wayne. Alicia Eger (center) opened Coco Blu in the Finer Things space last month. She’s shown here with Wynnewood jewelry designer Christie Gies and staffer Kelly Clarke of Devon. (Geis’ CGC Collection is one of several local labels at Coco Blu.) Eger’s former partner, Maria Delany, opened Louella in Louella Court until its Nov. move to the former DeLaurentis barbershop and Salon Tre Del on Lancaster Ave.

With apologies to runners up Bala/Narberth, Haverford/Bryn Mawr and Paoli/Malvern, Wayne, in this gal’s opinion, is the new style capital of the Main Line.

Bala Cynwyd and Ardmore not to mention nearby King of Prussia are certainly awash in department and chain stores.

But these days, no burg along the R 5 does indie style quite as well as Wayne.

In the last year alone, oodles of fresh mom and pop (in a hip, not hick way) fashion retailers have sprung up:

Louella, a modern take on Main Line style from former Finer Things co owner Maria Delany in the Louella Court until new digs are ready on Lancaster Ave.;

Coco Blu, fun, splashy and designer looks at the former Finer Things downtown brought to you by Alicia Eger, Finer Things’ other former co owner;

Feetures Head to Toe, footwear and edgy, trendy togs at the former Blue Horse Boutique downtown, transplanted after 30 years from Merion;

Eaves, easy, breezy Long Island inspired styles from Susan Ahn, a former Liefsdottir exec (Anthropologie’s upscale brand) at the former Dogma on Aberdeen Avenue;

Menagerie, “timeless to trendy” and “fine to faux” clothing, accessories, jewelry and gifts in Eagle Village;

Solemates, contemporary shoes and cowboy boots next to Lauren Hair Style;

And just a few months earlier came Fiore, a downtown Wayne meets Soho style, affordable boutique with Italian flair.

These seven (count ’em!) newcomers join such Wayne mainstays as Ellie, Christa’s Classics (now at the former Fresh Ayer space), Skirtin Around, J. McLaughlin, Vivi G. Shoes, Doncaster and Gramercy Boutique (under new ownership) in Eagle Village Shops and fashion emporiums Anthropologie and South Moon Under in greater Wayne. Maxx.

Truly, if you can’t outfit yourself in Wayne, you can’t get outfitted anywhere.

But there’s more to Wayne’s fashion boomlet than the convenience, gas savings and the civic pride Main Liners feel when they shop local.

There are economic benefits too.

New boutiques are “good for the tax base and good for businesses that see retail options as adding to the quality of life in the area,” said Bernard Dagenais,

President of the Main Line Chamber of Commerce in an e mail. “This is particularly good for suburban employers who are trying to attract and retain the best talent.”

Indeed, Wayne’s restaurant and retail trades feed off each other.

“Stores need to be where people are and the restaurants are a great draw,” he writes.

Like baking a cake from a box, creating a successful, sought after town is all about getting the right mix: offices, restaurants, shops, residences and increasingly for Wayne, fashion retailers.

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